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  • Onion Honey Syrup
  • Pickled Garlic
  • Want to Stop the Next Pandemic? Start Protecting Wildlife Habitats
    by Eric Roston / Bloomberg | Originally printed April 8, 2020, Time Magazine There are four critical facets of pandemic prevention, according to Lee Hannah, senior scientist at Conservation International. Three of them make immediate sense against the backdrop of our current emergency: stockpile masks and respirators; have testing infrastructure ready; and ban the global wildlife trade, including the open animal markets where COVID-19 may have first infected people. His fourth recommendation is more grandiose: “Take care of nature.” The assault on ecosystems that allowed COVID-19 to jump from animals to humans went far beyond merchants hunting and selling rare wildlife. Biodiversity—that is, the health of the entire ecosystem—can restrain pathogens before they ever leave the wild. “We need to tell people right now that there is a series of things we need to do once we’re out of this mess to make sure it never happens again,” Hannah says. The role of biodiversity in disease prevention has received increased attention of late. In a 2015 “state of knowledge review” of biodiversity and human health by the United Nations, scientists wrote that “an ecological approach to disease, rather than a simplistic ‘one germ, one disease’ approach, will provide a richer understanding of disease-related outcomes.” Recent research has given more support to the idea that biodiversity protection in one part of the world can prevent novel diseases from emerging and leaping into another. Read more…
  • Animal Viruses Are Jumping to Humans. Forest Loss Makes It Easier.
    by Catrin Einhorn / originally printed in New York Times, April 9 2020 The destruction of forests into fragmented patches is increasing the likelihood that viruses and other pathogens will jump from wild animals to humans, according to a study from Stanford University published this month. The research, which focused on contact between humans and primates in western Uganda, holds lessons for a world reeling from the coronavirus outbreak and searching for strategies to prevent the next global pandemic. “Covid has taught us that once a pandemic starts, it’s very hard to control,” said Laura Bloomfield, a doctoral candidate at Stanford and the study’s lead author. “If we can decrease the potential for people to come into contact with wild animals, that is one way to decrease the likelihood of having recurrent pandemics.” Read More ….
  • Apprenticing with Rosemary Gladstar Part Two
    Week two of Rosemary Gladstar’s apprentice program began around an inspirational opening circle, with everyone sharing stories of what they had been up to over the past year. Some people had exciting tales of products being picked up by retailers, others abandoned corporate jobs in favor of working for local nurseries and herb farms, and one classmate recently had a baby (which she even brought with her for the week!). Others had gone through serious illnesses with loved ones, and some, like me, had less dramatic tales to tell. Regardless of how our year had been, exciting changes or tragic losses, it was great to be together again; it felt as if no time had passed at all. Since I decided to fly to Vermont this year I didn’t have room to pack a tent and so I took up my usual residence in the yurt, which I was delighted to share with a wonderful woman and kindred spirit from New Zealand. After our circle, we ended the evening with a plant review slideshow and then Rosemary sent us off to bed, wishing us “golden dreams” as she told us they say in Italy.
  • Apprenticing with Rosemary Gladstar Part One
    I wasn’t sure what to expect when I arrived at Sage Mountain, herbal retreat and home of famous herbalist Rosemary Gladstar. I had traveled eight hours by myself from southern Pennsylvania to the mountains of Northern Vermont, following an inner voice that simply said I needed to go. Before I left, my husband asked me if I knew how to set up our tent as I was to camp out all week at Sage Mountain. I looked at him as if he’d lost his mind and told him of course I knew how to set up the tent, slightly offended.
  • Interview with Mountain Rose Herbs (FIND THIS LINK)
    The Moment I decided to become an herbalist….. The very moment….? All my life I’ve had a deep love and fascination with plants. I started ‘studying’ them when I was in the 7-8th grade and did my school projects both on Native edible and medicinal uses of plants of Sonoma County. These plants have always been special friends of mine my whole life, no matter how far I’ve traveled or lived. As I mentioned, I grew up on a small dairy farm in Sonoma County, surrounded by the lush greenery of the meadows and hills of this special plant paradise. And my grandmother, my mother’s mother, Mary Egitkhanoff, lived near us as we were growing up. She knew her plants! She use to tell us that it was her belief in God and her knowledge of the plants that saved her life. And she meant it literally. She and my grandfather both were survivors of the Armenian genocide. She felt it was her ‘religious duty’ to teach us about God ~ and plants. And what she taught, at least about the plants, stuck with me all my life!
  • Rosemary’s Herbal Journey
    All my life I’ve had a deep love and fascination with plants. I started ‘studying’ them when I was in the 7-8th grade and did my school projects both on Native edible and medicinal uses of plants of Sonoma County. These plants have always been special friends of mine my whole life, no matter how far I’ve traveled or lived. As I mentioned, I grew up on a small dairy farm in Sonoma County, surrounded by the lush greenery of the meadows and hills of this special plant paradise. And my grandmother, my mother’s mother, Mary Egitkhanoff, lived near us as we were growing up. She knew her plants! She use to tell us that it was her belief in God and her knowledge of the plants that saved her life. And she meant it literally. She and my grandfather both were survivors of the Armenian genocide. She felt it was her ‘religious duty’ to teach us about God ~ and plants. And what she taught, at least about the plants, stuck with me all my life!